Procedures: PAP Flap

The Profunda Artery Perforator Flap (PAP) utilizes the tissue of the upper thigh just below the buttock to reconstruct the breast following mastectomy.

Procedure Details

Donor sites are no longer limited to the abdomen and buttock allowing us to offer natural reconstruction to even more women who desire these procedures. The PAP Flap transfers only the skin and the fat, which are taken from the inner thigh and lower buttock, leaving the scar well hidden in the crease.

PAP Flap Details:

The skin and fat in this area get blood flow from the profunda femoris artery, which allows for versatility in choosing reattachment vessels at the mastectomy site. In addition, the skin and fat are ideal for coning to reconstruct a natural breast and, due to the location of the dissection, there is a greater reduction for the risk of lymphedema and seromas.
 While the PAP flap does not provide as much volume for breast reconstruction as a DIEP flap, it’s quickly becoming the go-to option after the DIEP.

Why Choose The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction?

Post Procedure Care

Learn more about the next steps and what you can expect following your natural breast reconstruction procedure.

Restored Lives!

Read real patient testimonials and hear their personal stories and experiences with natural breast reconstruction.

Expert Medical Team

Meet our dedicated surgical team who are at the forefront of breast reconstruction surgery and committed to our patients.

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